reading response

Strategy Behind Making Books Free

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O'Reilly has to have a strategy. I think his strategy is similarly different to what Mod discussed when he made the content of Art Space Tokyo free via the website. However, their strategies differ in that Mod's free content is only available via the website. To gain access to a book version of Art Space Tokyo, you need to purchase it. O'Reilly's giving his formatted copy away for free. So he has to have some reason for doing, meaning it has paid off or he thinks it will. So, my initial thought on the sustainability of "gift economies" is that it is possible.

If it's free it's me

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The shift towards the digital harkens a drastic change in how people consume media; the music industry, for example, has struggled to maintain control over its intellectual property in a world where audio files can be easily ripped, copied, burned, uploaded to YouTube or, God forbid, hosted on a P2P torrenting website.

Buy One Get One Free

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O’Reilly seems to take the same standpoint as Craig Mod. And like Mod, I think that O’Reilly will benefit from this. People like free things. Why else are we constantly bombarded with “buy one, get one free?” (especially as holiday season intrudes upon us) By giving this book to readers for free, O’Reilly is possibly placing their name in people’s heads. When you want to buy a book, instructive or otherwise, why not check O’Reilly first? It might be free and if not, well, still buy it from them because you like that the company is willing to give things to their readers.

Free is always good

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As a poor starving college student, I love free stuff. Whether it's a free t-shirt, free food, or free books, if it's being given out I'm trying to get it. Making books available for free is a huge draw for readers, but it can also be beneficial to the author as well. even though they may might not make money off of the sales for the free book, if the book is at all decent it will attract readers to the author's other books, which he or she can charge for. The free book is an incentive to read more by that author, which will boost the author's ultimate revenue.

Where's the Catch?

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Free books are alway good, but peruse the kindle store for the free books & it's either books that are project Gutenberg-esq or books that you don't even want to read. You have to hunt for the diamond in the rough. But with a large publisher releasing a free book like this- people's attention is piqued and the publisher now has the reader's attention. When you just google "oreilly iBooks" the first link is the one posted on the blog. You have the option to add the book to your cart at a price of $0.00. Nifty.

iBooks and Fish

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Last year in my Structure of Fiction class, there was one day where we got into a discussion about authors having Facebook. Our professor and several classmates expressed their frustration at not being able to find out more about their favorite authors because they didn't have a Facebook they could creep on or a Twitter account they could follow. It was usually little to no comfort if the author had a Wikipedia page because these tended to provide scant information.

Giving When it Matters

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Acknowledging the obvious perk of O'Reily's work, it's freeness, I think its considerable to give the audience an easily accessible education. In fact, I believe that every software should come with some sort of how-to manual without cost. Shouldn't software creators understand that not everyone will know the ins and outs of said program; such works that help us uncover the short cuts, allowing for a better final product, should always be available.

O'Reilly Unleashed

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Rather than write about the content of this resource, consider the fact that O'Reilly makes the book available for free, with no DRM (Digital Rights Management). What are the advantages for O'Reilly? For readers (besides the obvious, that it's free)? For the authors? Is a "gift economy" sustainable? Why or why not? Use these tags: reading response, gift economy

You Get What You Pay For

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The phrase, You get what you pay for, is normally used in regards to the consumer and the quality of the item they are purchasing. It infers that to get quality you must pay a higher cost for it, but the idea of free media releases like O'Reilly's book about ibooks author throws a slight wrinkle into this line of thinking. If the phrase is turned around and concentrated toward the producer or manufacturer instead of the consumer, how does its meaning change? In this case, O'Reilly certainly is paying for something.

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