reading response

E-books Clumsy?

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There are a couple of interesting points to raise in relation to Angela Chen’s article “Students Find ‘E-Textbooks Clumsy and Don’t Use their Interactive Features;” For one, the title is a bit misleading. After reading the article I noticed that while she does cite student’s responses to surveys as repeatedly mentioning poor navigation features as a con of the e-texts they were using, she gives very little context for this response. How was the survey set up for instance? Were the students specifically asked to say what they didn’t like?

When You Wish Upon a Book

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Steven Michel's article, "When You Wish Upon a Book," lays out his wish list from his Amazon account. The list includes over 600 titles from as far back as May 2001. He touches on a few of the books on his wish list that he'll probably never read such as "Eat, Pray, Love" and many other "embarrassing" titles that are offered up to the public. Rather than browsing the bookstores, he mainly just window shops and adds the books he sees to his wish list. He humorously claims that he put Borders out of business singlehandedly.

Reluctance to use digital resources

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I was initially drawn to the "Students Find E-Textbooks ‘Clumsy’ and Don’t Use Their Interactive Features" article because my thesis research is exploring this very issue. While numerous studies have shown that electronic resources such as videos and animations help students learn, other studies have continued to show that students don't use or like these resources. Furthermore, few studies have observed real students using actual textbooks to see what their behaviors are.

Why Ebooks Won't Rule The Earth

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I wanted to read "Why eBooks Won't Rule the Earth" to equalize the opinionated articles we have been reading; I feel like we've read more pro eBook than anti, which makes sense, of course. The author here made a point with regards to the appreciation of signatures: there is a special exchange that comes with meeting a favored writer and reaping the benefits of their ole John Hancock. Even more interesting is the plethora of books that will surpass the ebook and move on to the future form, that which we haven't seen yet, all together.

Back to Basics?

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I read the Chronicle article, "Students Find E-Textbooks ‘Clumsy’ and Don’t Use Their Interactive Features' by Angela Chen. The article describes several universities that have bought etexbooks and allow the students to use them for a lab fee. Teachers opt into this form of textbook instead of sending their students for the bookstore in the traditional sense. However, Chen describes that students aren't the new books in the way educators had hoped. Furthermore, it is the responsibility of the school to train teachers to use the ebooks and extra features.

Something Born from the Book

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I read the article “Publishing News: Consumers say the future of storytelling is all about interaction.” The article is broke down into 3 sections. The first talks about the 4 new I’s of storytelling: Immersion, Interactivity, Integration and Impact. Immersion focuses on the background of the story itself and its historical time period. With interactivity, people want to interact with the story and characters on a personal level, changing the way the story unfolds. Integration includes being able to access the story on multiple platforms and even transitioning it into real life.

Hesitating over the Unfamiliar and Unknown

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On Friday, my students and I went to Cooper Library. I asked them to find 2 books on their research topic from the library to help them learn to navigate the database and call numbers. Two of my students found e-books on their topic. One was excited--partially because navigating call numbers and the first floor of Cooper overwhelmed him--that he could read it on his laptop. Another student found an e-book available through Cooper but still used InterLibrary Loan to request a hard copy of it. Why this discrepancy?

Academe 2020

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Colleges are moving towards including less full text books, but this isn't because of students' shorter attention spans, in my opinion. It's just because there's so much material that professors can't hope to cover everything they need to in a semester and still include thorough readings of multiple books. That being said, many professors still do. I am still required to read all of Great Expectations for a class, despite the novel's imposing length. And that's okay.

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