reading response

Writing: one of the original lofty ideas

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Wachtell proposes that long-form texts are responsible for the dissemination of ideas. "Life on earth would be severely diminished without the well-thought-out, well-researched, written works that communicate expertise, insight, and creative ideas from one human being to another." Books, especially after the invention of the printing press, documented and spread these ideas. This allowed for others to build off an idea and then enhance and further develop the idea. And, long-form texts convey these ideas.

Read on!

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Yes! Physical books aren't important, it's the ideas they contain that are the valuable, need-to-be-preserved things. So says Wachtell, and I agree. She says that long-form texts (or lofty ideas) are the driving force behind publishers and often readers, and that no matter what format they are delivered in, they are vital to us because they make us think. But, as Machtell points out, they are not cheap. That's where the danger lies--people want to pay less for books, but the cost remains the same as far as the contributors to that book are concerned.

Haters Gonna Hate

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'Haters gonna hate, potatoes gonna potate': this is the initial thought that comes to mind post reading "Of Two Minds About Books" .Yet, when it comes down to it, I can reason with those who fear the loss of a books "feel". Feel encompasses the book; the feel is the aura- way more than perception of touch. I think that most people hate on ebooks prior to experiencing because this new medium, whether it be the iPad, Kindle, Nook, or some other form of tablet, because this form of innovative thinking has never retracted so eagerly from its original motive.

Imprimatur igitur (Therefore let it be printed)

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The lingering hegemony of print is an remnant of the technology's obstreperous history. Early pioneers of publishing recognized the power of written language and took measures to assure their dominance over it; in addition to the fact that the most important texts were printed exclusively in the language of the elite, their content was strictly regulated.

Fetishism: Old-World Romantic Seeking Partner to Correspond Through Letters Only

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I am continually surprised by the reluctance of readers (especially those of my generation) to embrace the electronic book. I swear I've heard all of the responses mentioned in the "Of Two Minds" article, my favorite being "the smell of the paper." Seriously? I have never understood an obsession with musty paper and crumbling glue. I guess I was the only kid at the library who liked to request collection purchases just so I could get the book before any other patrons.

Ebook Haters

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The “lingering hegemony of print” is so persistent because the printed book has been in existence for an incredible amount of time. It is unreasonable for people to think that society should immediately switch to a different form. I have grown up reading printed books, and I have begun to feel the pressure for ebooks intensifying.

Deep in the Hundred Acre Woods

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I'm one of those that hates e-books even if they've never seen one or read one. Always have been. No need to look around the room for my striped red shirt, bright blue pants, and dorky looking beanie. I'm coming out of the closet and admitting that I'm one of those ridiculous people who doesn't like digital publishing even when they haven't given it a try.

Conforming

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In the article, “Of Two Minds About Books,” Matt Richtel and Claire Miller highlight the emerging chasm between the opinions of eBooks and the opinions of print books. For many households, one member may refuse to read anything but a printed book while the other member enjoys reading on his or her iPad, Kindle, or other device. This difference of opinion is one that I have always questioned: Why is it that people are stuck on printed books and won’t give in to the trend of eBooks? For one, eBooks are cheaper (even if only a few dollars), easier to access, and much more portable.

Purgatorial Print

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Ah, the persistent "lingering hegemony of print." It's an apropos description. Pair it with Leo's idea of "printed purgatory," and it really sounds like tradition is digging in its heels. We're comfortable with print. We understand it. So using the metaphors that come with print seems appropriate. As new technologies become available, they are given metaphorical descriptions with which we are already familiar. Leo indicates this comfort with print throughout his article.

For The Love Of Print

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It's a fact that print books continue to linger. Why though? Jeffery R. Di Leo puts it best in his article when describes that we're attached to the permanence of the printed book; that people are still scared by the shear impermanence of an eBook. He goes on to describe that they way readers view print books is very different from the way they view e-publications. So I have to question... why? Is it because of the comfort of them? The longevity? The familiarity? I don't have an answer really, except that it's a much more emotional attachment than anything people can describe.

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