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Nick's @ Nine - Weekly Log 2/27

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Despite the winter weather this week, the Atlas team managed to really get started on the collaborative project. The entire team met at Nick's on Wednesday to talk about the project, determine responsibilities for the different parts of it, and map out a plan for getting it done.

Dr. Blakesely shared Atlas log-in information with the team, so we can really start figuring out how the program works. Unfortunately, we're finding it isn't the most user-friendly interface, so we're hoping to do some more digging to determine how it works.

The Creative Clouds - Weekly Log 2/27

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Despite the winter weather this week, the Atlas team managed to really get started on the collaborative project. The entire team met at Nick's on Wednesday to talk about the project, determine responsibilities for the different parts of it, and map out a plan for getting it done.

Dr. Blakesely shared Atlas log-in information with the team, so we can really start figuring out how the program works. Unfortunately, we're finding it isn't the most user-friendly interface, so we're hoping to do some more digging to determine how it works.

Everything is Art

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The idea that our work doesn't speak for itself was a new concept for me. In the last couple of years, I have had professors who were advocates of close reading. While close reading, one does not read or worry about anything beside the text. I had a professor who told us not to read footnotes. I never really 100% agreed with the idea of close reading. I feel like sometimes we need to know a little bit of background on the author or the time period to really get a piece.
So, I totally get what Kleon is saying!

There is a story behind everything. Every piece or art, every poem. Check out this painting that I saw in a coffee shop in downtown Greenville.

Subway Art

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In the spirit of showing my work, I decided to share two pieces of "art" that I've recently given as gifts. Last fall, my mom informed me of a new phenomenon called "subway art" after seeing some pieces designed by her co-worker. Basically subway art is just a creative typographic representation of a certain "category" of items. The most popular form is words that describe a certain city, and there are even subway art "generators" online that help people create these interesting pieces.

Showing Stories

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I've always been intrigued with the concept of telling stories through different means than words. I've heard some say that "every dance tells a story," but I disagree. Some dance just because they're moving with the music, and that's sometimes more beautiful than a storyline.

Here is a dance that I'm obsessed with, set to a song that I love, "Creep" by Radiohead, choreographed and performed by Bradley Kitchingham. Is the choreography based around a story, the mood of the song, or both? I don't even think it matters. It's absolutely beautiful.

Speak for Your Work

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Kleon’s idea that our work doesn’t speak for itself is something I find quite challenging. I always thought that people who speak about their work a lot are a bit into themselves if you know what I mean. I also never felt super confident about anything that I have ever created. The only real genius I see in myself is my wit, often on display in less than 140 characters. I understand Kleon’s idea and think it’s 100% true, but it is harder in practice than in theory.

Mona Lisa Smile

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I figured out that I'm kind of a fan of Austin Kleon's book, and I particularly like this assignment that we are supposed to post "artwork" that people at might understand better once they hear the story--the story of what it's about and why you made what you did.

I think that art, in all its various forms, is exactly this--subliminal messaging of your own thoughts and emotions that you are attempting to convey to your audience.
But I agree with Kleon's point--"Work doesn't speak for itself" and that "Pictures can say whatever we want them to say" (94).

Does this make you think of the Mona Lisa?
It's the most famous painting of all time, but honestly nobody really knows what's going on there.

The Calming Effect of Art

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Art always has a story behind it. The artist feels different things as they create it, and they are going through different things. Every piece of art an artist produces can bring back different memories and different emotions for them that can never completely be communicated with the reader/audience. An example of this in my own work is when I first got into my relationship, I was really nervous before the first date and so I drew a picture to calm my nerves.
wolf without shading

Showing Work and etc

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I was told recently by a friend from home, an exceptionally talented blogger whose work can be found here, that what makes a good story has a lot to do with how badly the author wants to tell it. If it's something that is there to take up space it is noticeable and it's probably not going to be as entertaining as something that the author really wanted and was excited to express. It kind of goes along with that quote, I can't remember who wrote it or how I found it (you could probably find it here), that goes something like "there is no story so exciting that it can't be made boring. There is no story so boring that it can't be made exciting."

Trolls

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Troll
http://www.wearemoviegeeks.com/2011/07/trollhunter-the-review/
I’ve never admitted to this so publicly before, but here goes it. I am a nerd. The kind of nerd that spends the weekend playing Dungeons and Dragons and staying up until 2 in the morning playing an online card game with my expert mage deck. Yeah.
This nerdiness has now become the driving force behind my desire to illustrate. I would love to go into character design for games or animation, but I am also looking into writing and illustrating children’s books or comic books.

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