clscott's blog

SPAM

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The term "spam" makes me think of the folder in my AOL email account that collects emails about Viagra, a free travel insulated bag from the AARP, and tips for hooking up with hot women (with subject lines that are a little too detailed). Obviously these aren't from anyone I know because I'm not a male senior citizen who's interested in women. The filter looks for certain key words that appear frequently in spam emails, such as Viagra, and email addresses that don't look real, such of deanofadmissions@leathermotorcyclejackets.net (yes, that's a real email on my block list).

The Wall

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In my philosophy class, we read We by Yegevny Zamyatin. In that society, there is a wall that confines people, who are all named with alphanumeric codes. The wall and the operations they receive are meant to prevent them from having an imagination so they can't rise up against the government.

we

Adapting to Different Standards of Writing

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We obviously write differently for different people. Here is where I found a great list of words that should never be used in an essay. Here are some other words I was taught never to use:

Obviously/clearly--if it's obvious or clear, you shouldn't have to explain it.
Because (at the beginning of a sentence)
In conclusion--this says that everything that follows is something you've already read
I/me/anything in first person unless the prompt specifically asks for something about you
?--you're supposed to answer questions, not pose more.

Hop on Pop and The Interview

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The reason why publishing a book is the most difficult process is because the result is so unpredictable. Some books get rejected by dozens of publishers before making a big breakthrough in the literary world. It's easy for a publisher to look at Hop on Pop by Dr. Seuss and assume that he's on drugs and nobody would buy something so ridiculous, but obviously lots of kids ended up liking books like that. Sometimes the book is also adjusted to fit the taste of a potential audience, and sometimes it's not and that causes problems. The Interview is a great example of a movie that faced lots of issues with its audience.

Showing Stories

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I've always been intrigued with the concept of telling stories through different means than words. I've heard some say that "every dance tells a story," but I disagree. Some dance just because they're moving with the music, and that's sometimes more beautiful than a storyline.

Here is a dance that I'm obsessed with, set to a song that I love, "Creep" by Radiohead, choreographed and performed by Bradley Kitchingham. Is the choreography based around a story, the mood of the song, or both? I don't even think it matters. It's absolutely beautiful.

Dictionary vs. Dictionary.com

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There's so much information that the Internet can give us. I can look up whatever I want at anytime as long as I have WiFi or 3G. I don't have to wait until I'm near an encyclopedia or a computer anymore.

I remember looking up words for my word study class in elementary school. I would learn random words along the way. I learned the word "contortionist" while I was looking up another word that started with C because there was a picture of one that caught my eye. dictionary.com doesn't provide that opportunity, but it provides me with what I want to know at the exact time I want it. When I was a senior in high school, my English teacher made it mandatory for us to use a printed dictionary and not an online one.

The Aesthetic of Clemson

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At freshman orientation, I fell in love with the view from Library Bridge. It looks straight onto the pond, which leads to the amphitheater, which leads to the green and the carillon bell. In art, it's a perfect example of a vanishing point and leading lines. I also love the drama that bright lights add to a dark scene. pond

Perseverance

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I really like the chart on page 20 about how many rejections famous authors have gotten for books that made them famous. This really shows that it's not about how good you are, it's about how your book appeals to certain people. Today, my former English professor posted about being displeased with the idea of a sequel to To Kill a Mockingbird because "it wasn't that good." At the same time, almost everyone I've met here was required to read it in high school, so that shows how different people's opinions can be, even if they're equally educated in literature.

Brain Faces Program

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In the first chapter of Smarter than you Think, Clive Thompson discusses the idea of humans and computers playing chess together and the effect that machinery has on human interaction. The machine will always outsmart the human, even with no intuition, but ultimately, the human could put an end to the machine and be the winner. The machine is not programmed to end the human, only to defeat it in chess. It brought to mind a really cute video I took of my foster puppies in their new home. The owners had a stuffed Santa Claus M&M that played "I'm Sexy and I Know It" and danced around.

The Photography Community

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The first chapter of Show Your Work describes how I learn to become a better photographer. I'm the president of the photography club here at Clemson and I try to create an environment where we can all learn from each other, even though we're not equal in skill level. We all have something to contribute, and there's no right or wrong way to approach a shot. Some of us like to freeze motion and others like blur because it shows speed of motion. Sometimes we take pictures of the exact same things, but edit them differently. Even if we choose not to take someone else's advice, it helps us figure out what is and isn't our style.