mkozma's blog

The Facebook Narcissist

By on

Tags: 

I think it was one of my friends who once told me that they no longer used Facebook because it was for narcissists, and I think sometimes I definitely agree with this mentality.

4461019149_448d2df8ee_o

Austin Kleon says that "They don't want to listen to your ideas; they want to tell you theirs...At some point, they didn't get the memo that the world owes none of us anything" (124). I think what Kleon means by this is that technology, especially social media in particular, is sometimes overused.

The Pluralistic Ignorant Hipster

By on

Tags: 

After reading this chapter of Clive Thompson's Smarter Than You Think, I personally wasn't aware of what "pluralistic ignorance" was (still), but this nice little definition that Google gave me I think gives me a little more insight:

"In social psychology, pluralistic ignorance is a situation in which a majority of group members privately reject a norm, but incorrectly assume that most others accept it, and therefore go along with it. This is also described as "no one believes, but everyone thinks that everyone believes."

This is sort of funny to me, and reminds me of those annoying people in high school who kept talking about how everyone was condoning animal cruelty because they didn't understand or appreciate vegetarianism.

I Guess Group Work Isn't So Bad After All

By on

Tags: 

After reading the Chapter "Ambient Awareness" in Clive Thompson's Smarter Than You Think, I was honestly surprised that there was a chapter like this in the book. Thompson's book, in my opinion, covers a lot of ground and I wasn't really expecting to read anything about group work. The quote that appears: "Ambient awareness also endows us with new, sometimes startling abilities. When groups of people "think aloud" in this lightweight fashion, they can perform astonishing acts of collaborative cognition" (Thompson 212-3). I honestly am a big believer in group collaboration, but at the same time sometimes I am hesitant to share my ideas with others especially in the form of social media networking.

Self-Publishing is so Hairy Nowadays

By on

Tags: 

The "harriest chapter in the book," or Chapter 13 of Kawasaki and Welch's APE, actually did seem pretty hairy (harry?) to me.

And I had to look up exactly what "hairy" meant here. And it wasn't an abundance of hair.
It apparently means "alarming and difficult."

This makes sense! I mean self-publishing, like we've repeatedly been told is in many ways a GREAT thing. But it is particularly quite hairy because there are so many ways to do it--and deciding which one to use is especially alarming and sometimes difficult for beginners in the world of self-publishing.

Mona Lisa Smile

By on

Tags: 

I figured out that I'm kind of a fan of Austin Kleon's book, and I particularly like this assignment that we are supposed to post "artwork" that people at might understand better once they hear the story--the story of what it's about and why you made what you did.

I think that art, in all its various forms, is exactly this--subliminal messaging of your own thoughts and emotions that you are attempting to convey to your audience.
But I agree with Kleon's point--"Work doesn't speak for itself" and that "Pictures can say whatever we want them to say" (94).

Does this make you think of the Mona Lisa?
It's the most famous painting of all time, but honestly nobody really knows what's going on there.

50 Shades of Introverted Writers

By on

Tags: 

I really liked the story that Clive Thompson used in Chapter 3: Public Thinking of Smarter Than You Think when he talked about the successful blogger Kenyan-born Ory Okolloh and how she refused to write a book because she described herself as having "a very introverted real personality" (46).

HAHA. What?
Blogging is introverted? I guess I've never really thought of it that way, but I guess in a sense she is right--wanting to be published does involve having a little bit of an extroverted personality. You are basically putting your work out there for others to see. And blogging on the other hand is a little more private.

Hallway Design

By on

Tags: 

I'll admit I'm definitely a person who will spend a good bit of time in Daniel reading all of the various flyers and posters on the bulletin boards. And so, for me, this assignment really hits home--in a good way. As an intern in the Pearce Center for Professional Communication sometimes I'm the one actually creating them, and so it's important to kind of notice what works and well...what doesn't.

I'm definitely a design fan (I've been pinning cover art and spreadsheets on Pinterest for a good year now) and I like Chip Kidd's book so far. He seems to know what he's doing at least.

Writing Your Own Book, Now That's Democracy

By on

Tags: 

Have you guys ever noticed that the word authority has the word author in it? This is something that just occurred to me, I swear. But I feel like it is totally relevant to Kawasaki's points on traditional publishing, the self-publishing revolution, and the ascent of eBooks.

Something that certainly stuck with me was in Chapter 3--(The Three "D's" of Self-Publishing). Determination, Democratization, and something Kawasaki calls disintermediation. Which isn't really a word. I looked it up.

But democracy?
Honestly the last thing I'm thinking of when thinking about my potential career in publishing is anything remotely close to politics, but Kawasaki has a different way of looking at it.

The Life-Loggers and Human-Correcters

By on

Tags: 

I'm not going to lie. These two chapters kind of freaked me out a bit. They also kind of caught me off-guard a little since I was expecting to read more motivational tips like from Kleon.

That's not to say this wasn't EXTREMELY interesting. I think it was mainly the discomfort I felt from reading mainly Chapter Two's "We, the Memorius" where Thompson tells the story of MIT speech scientist Deb Roy, and his decision to document his life after placing video cameras and ultra-sensitive microphones in every room in his house.
I MEAN WHO DOES THAT?

Show Your Work Even Though Haters Gonna Hate

By on

Tags: 

Austin Kleon pretty much starts out his book with the concept by Honore de Balzac: "For artists, the great problem to solve is how to get oneself noticed" and I feel like this really applies to me and cheesily ties into Kleon's title Show Your Work. Just SHOW YOUR WORK. This is something that a lot of people have a hard time doing. I know for me specifically, I was always that person in the back of every creative writing class I've ever taken finding excuses like "It's not finished," "It's too short," "It's too long," or my personal favorite--"I don't think I did the assignment right."