Calendar

Follow the links at the bottom of this page for a schedule of readings, assignments, and due dates for each week of this semester. Unless specifically noted otherwise, all assignments are to be completed before class on the day listed.

This course calendar may be updated throughout the semester. I'll notify you about any major changes, but you are still responsible for keeping up with the current schedule.

IMPORTANT: You must visit all of the links provided within the course calendar. There are many links to follow and read. Make sure you visit all of them. Some links provide easy access to other parts of the class site which will help you in your coursework. Some links are to required readings. Others provide you with detailed instructions on completing projects. Eventually, you may come to know the instructions that supplement assignments repeated throughout the course, but it's still a good idea to continue to revisit the instructions to make sure that you are satisfying all of the course requirements.

Week 1: January 8

Tuesday, January 8

Goals for Today

  • Introduction to the course and each other.
  • Review carefully the Course Description, paying particular attention to all requirements. It is important that you become very familiar with the course projects and policies so you can understand what is expected of you in this class.

Activities to Complete by Tuesday, January 13

Before Tuesday, January 13, please complete all of these steps:

Week 2: January 13 and 15

Tuesday, January 13

Due Today

In-Class Activities

  • Overview of the Course Drupal Site
  • Inventory of Classroom Technologies (software, display/presentation, peripherals). In groups of three or four, take inventory of software, hardware, and peripherals that we have available to us in the MATRF.

Activities to Complete by Thursday, January 15

  • I've created a post on the course home page (Introductions) inviting you to introduce yourself. Post a comment to that post in which you
    • describe where you are from
    • give your course of study and year in your graduate program
    • talk about your areas of scholarly/creative interest and career goals
    • tell what you would like to get out of this course
    • describe one or more of your favorite books and what you like about it; include an image of the book's cover, which you can get with a Google image search.
  • Send an email to me (dblakes@clemson.edu) to let me know that you've begun the course successfully. Your email should be sent before Thursday's class meeting. I will reply (almost always within 24 hours, often much faster). Your email should follow the principles and conventions of writing effective email (PDF at Dropbox).

Thursday, January 15

Due Today

  • I've created a post on the course home page (Introductions) inviting you to introduce yourself. Post a comment to that post in which you
    • describe where you are from
    • give your course of study and year in your graduate program
    • talk about your areas of scholarly/creative interest and career goals
    • tell what you would like to get out of this course
    • describe one or more of your favorite books and what you like about it; include an image of the book's cover, which you can get with a Google image search.
  • Send an email to me (dblakes@clemson.edu) to let me know that you've begun the course successfully. Your email should be sent before Thursday's class meeting. I will reply (almost always within 24 hours, often much faster). Your email should follow the principles and conventions of writing effective email (PDF at Dropbox).

In-Class Activities

  • Inventory of Classroom Technologies (software, display/presentation, peripherals). In groups of three or four, take inventory of software, hardware, and peripherals that we have available to us in the MATRF.

Activities to Complete by Tuesday, January 20

  • Create your first blog post. We will go over best practices for posting (the best way to "show your work") during class. Topic: Please read and ponder parts 1 and 2 of Show Your Work by Austin Kleon ("You Don't Have to Be a Genius" and "Think Process, Not Product"). Read "Principles of Reading Responses and then follow the general principles of posting to your blog here: Principles for Posting to Your Weblog. You could take the "advice" Kleon offers and run with it (so, "Be an Amateur" might prompt a response about something that deeply interests you, that you know a lot about, but that you also have never really been formally trained to study as a student or scholar). There are a bunch of other possibilities, jumping off from lots of tidbits in these two sections. Remember also that the point of this is to "Show Your Work" (e.g., share your creativity and get discovered), so you're writing to a broad audience of smart people (not just the ones in our class!). Remember: 150-200 words, at least two images, and at least two links. You can get stock images from Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons, or Unsplash. (These and other links to asset archives are collected on our course site here. Please record any citation information so that you can add it to your captions. TAGS: blog1, show your work, and any others that may be relevant.

Week 3: January 20 and 22

Tuesday, January 20

Due Today

  • Create your first blog post. We will go over best practices for posting (the best way to "show your work") during class. Topic: Please read and ponder parts 1 and 2 of Show Your Work by Austin Kleon ("You Don't Have to Be a Genius" and "Think Process, Not Product"). Read "Principles of Reading Responses and then follow the general principles of posting to your blog here: Principles for Posting to Your Weblog. You could take the "advice" Kleon offers and run with it (so, "Be an Amateur" might prompt a response about something that deeply interests you, that you know a lot about, but that you also have never really been formally trained to study as a student or scholar). There are a bunch of other possibilities, jumping off from lots of tidbits in these two sections. Remember also that the point of this is to "Show Your Work" (e.g., share your creativity and get discovered), so you're writing to a broad audience of smart people (not just the ones in our class!). Remember: 150-200 words, at least two images, and at least two links. You can get stock images from Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons, or Unsplash. (These and other links to asset archives are collected on our course site here. Please record any citation information so that you can add it to your captions. TAGS: blog1, show your work, and any others that may be relevant.

In-Class Activities

  • Discussion of Show Your Work
  • Introduction to O'Reilly Atlas. Watch this video:

Activities to Complete by Thursday, January 22

  • Everyone should plan on responding and commenting to at least three blog posts by your peers. Responses should engage the subject/topic, suggest alternative resources or ideas, and help the writer make connections to broader networks of inquiry.

Thursday, January 22

Due Today

Everyone should plan on responding and commenting to at least three blog posts by your peers. Responses should engage the subject/topic, suggest alternative resources or ideas, and help the writer make connections to broader networks of inquiry.

In-Class Activities

Activities to Complete by Tuesday, January 27

  • Reading. Read the first two chapters ("The Rise of the Centaurs" and "We, the Memorius") in Clive Thompson's Smarter Than You Think (pp. 1-44).
  • Blogging. Respond to the reading by focusing on one or more key points in these two chapters, points such as "Every new tool shapes the way we think, as well as what we think about" (7) or William Gibson's idea that "The future is already here—it's not very evenly distributed" (9). (These are just examples, so you can venture to your own favorites. Write a blog post in which you elaborate on Thompson's idea, connect it to your own experience, and then connect it with the experience of others. As always, include two more more images (photographs that you take and that might illustrate your ideas work really well!) and two external links to the work or writing of others. TAGS: blog2, smarter, and any others that may be relevant.

Week 4: January 27 and 29

Tuesday, January 27

Due Today

  • Reading. Read the first two chapters ("The Rise of the Centaurs" and "We, the Memorius") in Clive Thompson's Smarter Than You Think (pp. 1-44).
  • Blogging. Respond to the reading by focusing on one or more key points in these two chapters, points such as "Every new tool shapes the way we think, as well as what we think about" (7) or William Gibson's idea that "The future is already here—it's not very evenly distributed" (9). (These are just examples, so you can venture to your own favorites. Write a blog post in which you elaborate on Thompson's idea, connect it to your own experience, and then connect it with the experience of others. As always, include two more more images (photographs that you take and that might illustrate your ideas work really well!) and two external links to the work or writing of others. TAGS: blog2, smarter, and any others that may be relevant.

In-Class Activities

  • Formation of Project Teams
  • Discussion of Smarter Than You Think
  • Major Collaborative Book Project Assigned

Activities to Complete by Thursday, January 29

Thursday, January 29

Due Today

Everyone should plan on responding and commenting to at least three blog posts by your peers. Responses should engage the subject/topic, suggest alternative resources or ideas, and help the writer make connections to broader networks of inquiry.

In-Class Activities

Activities to Complete by Tuesday, January 27

  • Reading. Read Chapters 2, 3, and 4 in APE.
  • Blogging. Respond to the reading by describing the most important thing you learned about the future of the book from these three chapters ("Traditional Publishing," "The Self-Publishing Revolution," or "The Ascent of eBooks.") As always, include two more more images (photographs that you take and that might illustrate your ideas work really well!) and two external links to the work or writing of others. TAGS: blog3, publishing, and any others that may be relevant.

Week 5: February 3 and 5

Tuesday, February 3

Due Today

  • Reading. Read Chapters 2, 3, and 4 in APE.
  • Blogging. Respond to the reading by describing the most important thing you learned about the future of the book from these three chapters ("Traditional Publishing," "The Self-Publishing Revolution," or "The Ascent of eBooks.") As always, include two more more images (photographs that you take and that might illustrate your ideas work really well!) and two external links to the work or writing of others. TAGS: blog3, publishing, and any others that may be relevant.

In-Class Activities

Activities to Complete by Thursday, February 5

  • Everyone should plan on responding and commenting to at least three blog posts by your peers. Responses should engage the subject/topic, suggest alternative resources or ideas, and help the writer make connections to broader networks of inquiry.
  • Check out the Parlor Press website to see its catalog, series, and general focus. You'll be given a list of titles to choose from for completing your individual book project soon.
  • Creating. First, read the two-page decription in Go by Chip Kidd on starting a scrapbook of designs you like (Design Project 1, p. 122). Then, if you don't have a Pinterest account, create one that will serve as your own scrapbook for collecting design ideas, particularly ones related to books, book design, and publishing. Collect at least five pins to get started. If you haven't used Pinterest before, watch this overview and then read about Pins, Boards, Following, Home Feed and more. Once you have your Pinterest account created, add it to your profile on Behance so that others can follow your pins if they choose. (See the "On the Web" block on the left side of your profile page.)

Please Note!

Dr. Blakesley has to attend Board of Trustees meetings at the Madren Center, so there will be no in-person class meeting. However, be sure to complete the work assigned and note the reading for next week (Feb. 12).

Thursday, February 5

Dr. Blakesley has to attend Board of Trustees meetings at the Madren Center, so there will be no in-person class meeting.

Due Today

  • Everyone should plan on responding and commenting to at least three blog posts by your peers. Responses should engage the subject/topic, suggest alternative resources or ideas, and help the writer make connections to broader networks of inquiry.
  • Creating. If you don't have a Pinterest account, create one that will serve as your own scrapbook for collecting design ideas, particularly ones related to books, book design, and publishing. Collect at least five pins to get started. If you haven't used Pinterest before, watch this overview and then read about Pins, Boards, Following, Home Feed and more. Once you have your Pinterest account created, add it to your profile on Behance so that others can follow your pins if they choose. (See the "On the Web" block on the left side of your profile page.)

Activities to Complete by Tuesday, February 10

  • Reading. Go by Chip Kidd. Introduction ("Okay, So Just What Is Graphic Design") and Chapter 1 ("Form").
  • Blogging. Respond to the reading by taking three photographs of something you see on campus representing good or interesting design and that have someting, even remotely, to do with books or the ideas or activities that swirl around books as material things and concepts. Include the three images in your blog, and then describe why you chose them, what you like about their design, and anything else that comes to mind. It's okay to think abstractly and metaphorically, so, for example, the object you photograph might convey the "idea" of a book, even if it's not material book. This week, you'll need three images in your blog post, but you only need to link elsewhere if doing so enhances your post. TAGS: blog4, design, and any others that may be relevant.

Week 6: February 10 and 12

Tuesday, February 10

Due Today

  • Reading. Go by Chip Kidd. Introduction ("Okay, So Just What Is Graphic Design") and Chapter 1 ("Form").
  • Blogging. Respond to the reading by taking three photographs of something you see on campus representing good or interesting design and that have someting, even remotely, to do with books or the ideas or activities that swirl around books as material things and concepts. Include the three images in your blog, and then describe why you chose them, what you like about their design, and anything else that comes to mind. It's okay to think abstractly and metaphorically, so, for example, the object you photograph might convey the "idea" of a book, even if it's not material book. This week, you'll need three images in your blog post, but you only need to link elsewhere if doing so enhances your post. TAGS: blog4, design, and any others that may be relevant.

In-Class Activities

Activities to Complete by Thursday, February 12

  • Be sure that you're able to run InDesign CC 2014 on a computer that you have easy access to. We'll be working on books in InDesign often from this point forward.

Thursday, February 12

In-Class Activities

  • Assign books to project teams; share content with Atlas teams; begin individual book projects.
  • Here are two links to a majority of the books for the Adobe DPS Project:
  • Meet in Project Teams. There are 35 titles to include in the Adobe DPS App, so each team should select 11 titles to work on (Dr. B. will be helping, so don't worry!)

Activities to Complete by Tuesday, February 17

  • Reading. Read the chapters 3 and 4 ("Public Thinking" and "The New Literacies") in Clive Thompson's Smarter Than You Think (pp. 45-114).
  • Blogging. Respond to the reading by focusing on one or more key points in these two chapters, with a particular focus on the nature of new literacies, how these relate to publishing and books, or writing and creativity in the digital age. (These are just examples, so you can venture to your own favorites. Write a blog post in which you elaborate on Thompson's idea, connect it to your own experience, and then connect it with the experience of others. As always, include two more more images (photographs that you take and that might illustrate your ideas work really well!) and two external links to the work or writing of others. TAGS: blog5, smarter, and any others that may be relevant.

Week 7: February 17 and 19

Tuesday, February 17

Due Today

  • Reading. Read the chapters 3 and 4 ("Public Thinking" and "The New Literacies") in Clive Thompson's Smarter Than You Think (pp. 45-114).
  • Blogging. Respond to the reading by focusing on one or more key points in these two chapters, with a particular focus on the nature of new literacies, how these relate to publishing and books, or writing and creativity in the digital age. (These are just examples, so you can venture to your own favorites. Write a blog post in which you elaborate on Thompson's idea, connect it to your own experience, and then connect it with the experience of others. As always, include two more more images (photographs that you take and that might illustrate your ideas work really well!) and two external links to the work or writing of others. TAGS: blog5, smarter, and any others that may be relevant.

Activities to Complete by Thursday, February 19

  • Be sure that you're able to run InDesign CC 2014 on a computer that you have easy access to. We'll be working on books in InDesign often from this point forward.
  • Be prepared to select your books for the Individual Book Project from the list to be provided in class.

Thursday, February 19

In-Class Activities

  • Discuss the Case Study Project.
  • Assign books to project teams; share content with Atlas teams; begin individual book projects.
  • Here are two links to a majority of the books for the Adobe DPS Project:
  • Start meeting individually with Dr. B. to choose and discuss the book for your Individual Book Project

Activities to Complete by Tuesday, February 24

  • Reading. Austin Kleon, Show Your Work (Chapters 3, 4, and 5; "Share Something Small Everyday," "Open Up Your Cabinet of Curiosities," and "Tell Good Stories")
  • Blogging. Respond to the reading by focusing on what's involved in telling good stories and, in particular, the idea that "our work doesn't speak for itself" (93). Find one example of your own work (something you created) that doesn't speak for itself and tell its story. Your work could be something you wrote, a group project, a video, artwork, or anything else that you worked hard on and that is meaningful to you in some way. As always, include two more more images (images or examples of the work) and two external links to the work or writing of other that may be related. TAGS: blog6, stories, and any others that may be relevant.

Week 8: February 24 and 26

Tuesday, February 24

Due Today

  • Reading. Austin Kleon, Show Your Work (Chapters 3, 4, and 5; "Share Something Small Everyday," "Open Up Your Cabinet of Curiosities," and "Tell Good Stories")
  • Blogging. Respond to the reading by focusing on what's involved in telling good stories and, in particular, the idea that "our work doesn't speak for itself" (93). Find one example of your own work (something you created) that doesn't speak for itself and tell its story. Your work could be something you wrote, a group project, a video, artwork, or anything else that you worked hard on and that is meaningful to you in some way. As always, include two more more images (images or examples of the work) and two external links to the work or writing of other that may be related. TAGS: blog6, stories, and any others that may be relevant.

Activities to Complete by Thursday, February 26

  • Be sure that you're able to run InDesign CC 2014 on a computer that you have easy access to. We'll be working on books in InDesign often from this point forward.
  • Be prepared to select your books for the Individual Book Project from the list to be provided in class.

Thursday, February 26

Snow Day (Clemson cancelled).

Activities to Complete by Tuesday, March 3

Week 9: March 3 and 5

Tuesday, March 3

Due Today

In-Class Activities

  • Work on processing ebooks for the Individual Book Project (follow-along demonstration).

Activities to Complete by Thursday, March 5

  • Complete the export process on your book (Individual Book Project) and be prepared to iron out any issues during class. The goal is to have your ePub version done by the end of class on Thursday.

Thursday, March 5

Due Today

  • Complete the export process on your book (Individual Book Project) and be prepared to iron out any issues during class. The goal is to have your ePub version done by the end of class on Thursday.

Activities to Complete by Tuesday, March 3

  • Reading. Read Chapters 8–13 in APE. Focus in particular on Chapter 13, "How to Convert Your File."
  • Blogging. Why do Kawasaki and Welch describe Chapter 13 as the "harriest chapter in the book"? What's hard about preparing a book for distribution to a wider audience along all the channels they describe in Chapter 12? How does or should "dissemination" of content influence the composition of a book in the first place? What would you tell aspiring authors or self-publishers about the process? You can answer any or all of these questions. As always, include two more more images (screenshots of your own workspace while producing an ebook might work well!) and two external links to the work or writing of others. TAGS: blog7, publishing, and any others that may be relevant.

Week 10: March 10 and 12

Tuesday, March 10

Due Today

  • Reading. Read Chapters 8–13 in APE. Focus in particular on Chapter 13, "How to Convert Your File."
  • Blogging. Why do Kawasaki and Welch describe Chapter 13 as the "harriest chapter in the book"? What's hard about preparing a book for distribution to a wider audience along all the channels they describe in Chapter 12? How does or should "dissemination" of content influence the composition of a book in the first place? What would you tell aspiring authors or self-publishers about the process? You can answer any or all of these questions. As always, include two more more images (screenshots of your own workspace while producing an ebook might work well!) and two external links to the work or writing of others. TAGS: blog7, publishing, and any others that may be relevant.
  • Complete these "Steps for Preparing an InDesign File for eBook Production."

In-Class Activities

  • Work on processing ebooks for the Individual Book Project (follow-along demonstration).

Activities to Complete by Thursday, March 12

  • Complete the export process on your book (Individual Book Project) and be prepared to iron out any issues during class. The goal is to have your ePub version done by the end of class on Thursday.

Thursday, March 12

Due Today

  • Complete the export process on your book (Individual Book Project) and be prepared to iron out any issues during class. The goal is to have your ePub version done by the end of class on Thursday.

Activities to Complete by Tuesday, March 24

  • Continue working on your ePub versions of your individual book projects during spring break
  • No reading/blog post is due

Week 11: March 24 and 26

Tuesday, March 24

Due Today

In-Class Activities

  • Work on processing ebooks for the Individual Book Project (follow-along demonstration), including Kindle and iBook formats.

Activities to Complete by Thursday, March 26

  • Complete the export process on your book (Individual Book Project) for Kindle and iBook formats and be prepared to iron out any issues during class.

Thursday, March 26

Due Today

  • Complete the export process on your book (Individual Book Project) for Kindle and iBook formats and be prepared to iron out any issues during class.

Activities to Complete by Tuesday, March 31

  • Continue working on your ePub versions of your individual book projects during spring break
  • Reading. Read "Digital School" and "Ambient Awareness" in Smarter Than You Think (175-244).
  • Blogging. Address either of these two questions: From "Digital School": How does writing (and/or designing) for a public audience affect what you say, how you think about your work and what difference it might make? Or, from "Ambient Awareness": Describe the idea of "ambient contact" and how it has worked in one situation you've been involved in. As always, include two more more images (screenshots of your own workspace while producing an ebook might work well!) and two external links to the work or writing of others. TAGS: blog8, digital publics, and any others that may be relevant.

Week 12: March 30 and April 2

Tuesday, March 30

Due Today

  • Reading. Read "Digital School" and "Ambient Awareness" in Smarter Than You Think (175-244).
  • Blogging. Address either of these two questions: From "Digital School": How does writing (and/or designing) for a public audience affect what you say, how you think about your work and what difference it might make? Or, from "Ambient Awareness": Describe the idea of "ambient contact" and how it has worked in one situation you've been involved in. As always, include two more more images (screenshots of your own workspace while producing an ebook might work well!) and two external links to the work or writing of others. TAGS: blog8, digital publics, and any others that may be relevant.

In-Class Activities

  • Work on processing ebooks for the Individual Book Project (follow-along demonstration), including Kindle and iBook formats.
  • Meet in collaborative book project groups. Prepare to present a progress report to the rest of the class on Thursday

Activities to Complete by Thursday, April 2

  • Prepare to present a progress report on your collaborative book project to the rest of the class on Thursday

Thursday, April 2

Due Today

  • Present a progress report on your collaborative book project to the rest of the class on Thursday
  • Respond to Dr. B's request for information about your blog posts, nominated blog posts, and comments.

Activities to Complete by Tuesday, April 7

  • Continue working on your ePub versions of your individual book projects during spring break
  • Reading. Read "The Connected Society" in Smarter Than You Think (245).
  • Blogging. Address either this question or one that you create: What is pluralistic ignorance and what is its impact? How does the connected society address it? What could we do with books to address it? (Think about sharing, collaborative reading, networked reading, etc.) As always, include two more more images (screenshots of your own workspace while producing an ebook might work well!) and two external links to the work or writing of others. TAGS: blog8, pluralistic ignorance, and any others that may be relevant.

Week 13: April 7 and 9

Tuesday, April 7

Due Today

  • Reading. Read "The Connected Society" in Smarter Than You Think (245).
  • Blogging. Address either this question or one that you create: What is pluralistic ignorance and what is its impact? How does the connected society address it? What could we do with books to address it? (Think about sharing, collaborative reading, networked reading, etc.) As always, include two more more images (screenshots of your own workspace while producing an ebook might work well!) and two external links to the work or writing of others. TAGS: blog8, pluralistic ignorance, and any others that may be relevant.

In-Class Activities

  • Work on processing ebooks for the Individual Book Project (follow-along demonstration), including Kindle and iBook formats.
  • Meet in collaborative book project groups. Prepare to present a progress report to the rest of the class on Thursday

Thursday, April 9

Due Today

  • Present a progress report on your collaborative book project to the rest of the class on Thursday

Activities to Complete by Tuesday, April 14

  • Continue working on your ePub versions of your individual book projects.
  • Reading. Read Chapters 6, 7, and 8 in Show Your Work (111-57).
  • Blogging. What does Kleon have in mind when he says that we shouldn't "turn into human spam"? If we don't promote our own work, who will? What do you think he has in mind? Find an example or two of human spam (not the obvious email kind, but the more subtle but still spammy kind). You could look at any social network (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest) or retails sites like Lulu.com, Amazon.com, or even GoodReads for possible examples. As always, include two more more images (screenshots of your own workspace while producing an ebook might work well!) and two external links to the work or writing of others. TAGS: blog9, human spam, and any others that may be relevant.

Week 14: April 14 and 16

Tuesday, April 14

Due Today

  • Reading. Read Chapters 6, 7, and 8 in Show Your Work (111-57).
  • Blogging. What does Kleon have in mind when he says that we shouldn't "turn into human spam"? If we don't promote our own work, who will? What do you think he has in mind? Find an example or two of human spam (not the obvious email kind, but the more subtle but still spammy kind). You could look at any social network (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest) or retails sites like Lulu.com, Amazon.com, or even GoodReads for possible examples. As always, include two more more images (screenshots of your own workspace while producing an ebook might work well!) and two external links to the work or writing of others. TAGS: blog9, human spam, and any others that may be relevant.

In-Class Activities

  • Work on processing ebooks for the Individual Book Project (follow-along demonstration), including Kindle and iBook formats.
  • Meet in collaborative book project groups.

Thursday, April 16

Dr. B. will be traveling to George Mason University to present on "Creative Dividends in the Digital Economy." Please plan on meeting with your groups to finalize plans for your group projects and case studies.

Activities to Complete by Tuesday, April 21

  • Continue working on your ePub versions of your individual book projects. Be prepared to receive directions for turning in all of your work by the end of this week.
  • No reading or blog posts due this week.

Week 15: April 21 and 23

Tuesday, April 21

In-Class Activities

  • Discuss submission procedures for individual and group projects.
  • Work on processing ebooks for the Individual Book Project, including Kindle and iBook formats (45 mins.).
  • Meet in collaborative book project groups to complete the project (30 mins.)

Submitting Individual and Group Projects

Individual Projects

1. You should submit the following to a new folder in your "Individual Book Projects" folder in your Creative Cloud Assets (go to adobe.com, log in, and then you'll see the folders you have access to). Under "Actions," select "Create Folder." Call it "ebooks Completed" (as shown here).

2. In your eBooks Completed folder, you should submit these files, named as shown. Be sure the file extensions are correct.

  • booktitle.epub (e.g., mortedarthur.epub)
  • booktitle.iba (iBooks Author file; which can be edited later)
  • booktitle.ibooks (the actual iBook for reading/viewing)
  • booktitle.mobi (Kindle format)
  • Packaged InDesign Folder: When you are done exporting/formatting the InDesign content, save that InDesign file with a new name (e.g., mortedarthur-epub.indd) and then "package" the file (File > Package). Put the whole packaged folder (containing InDesign file, a PDF, and font/links subfolders) into your eBooks Completed folder.
  • Submission Notes: if there are any notes or issues Dr. B. should know about, you could also include a SubmissionNotes.docx file with that content.

Group Projects

Your team will need to be sure to share files with the other DPS or Atlas team prior to completing the project(s). In the end, team leaders should create and share folders with these names:

DPS Teams

DPS Application Assets: In this folder, put all the separate InDesign files for each of the book pages to be included in the App. Please include the original template you worked with, any source images (e.g., book covers, logos, etc.) also. To make sure the images used in individual book pages are included, there will be a packaged folder for each book page (see directions above for creating a packaged folder in InDesign.

Case Study: DPS. Create a "Case Study DPS" folder and put your complete case study (or a link to it on a submission page, if using something like Slate) and video file(s) there. Video files should be processed for Web delivery. (You may put them at YouTube or Vimeo and just share the link if you prefer.) Since the format and content may vary, at minimum there should be one page in this folder with an explanation of what has been submitted. (Include all team member names on submission notes.)

Atlas Teams

WACBook Files: This should be submitted in the form of an InDesign packaged folder. You can put it in the "Atlas Assets" folder that you already share. Call it the WACBook Folder. A goal is to prepare the InDesign file so that it is ready to export to ePub and other formats, so please also include the ePub formatted book.

Case Study: Atlas. Create a "Case Study DPS" folder and put your complete case study (or a link to it on a submission page, if using something like Slate) and video file(s) there. Video files should be processed for Web delivery. (You may put them at YouTube or Vimeo and just share the link if you prefer.) Since the format and content may vary, at minimum there should be one page in this folder with an explanation of what has been submitted. (Include all team member names on submission notes.)

Thursday, April 23

In-Class Activities

  • Work on processing ebooks for the Individual Book Project, including Kindle and iBook formats (45 mins.).
  • Meet in collaborative book project groups to complete the project (30 mins.)

Activities to Complete by Monday, April 27 (by Midnight)