Writing and Designing for a Public Audience

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computerTo be honest, I love this book. “Smarter than You Think” addresses key problems and situations in our society that focuses on the move towards a technological future. With regards to writing for a public audience, I think that having that extra pressure encourages me to do better with my work. When we write to just turn into our professor, the pressure to perform well is there, but less. Writing for a public audience is scary, and also adds another aspect to writing: interest.

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When we write for a professor, we aren’t writing to interest the professor (at least I’m not). We all know they have to read it, it’s their job. Writing for a public audience is scary because you want your audience to be entertained. You want them to want to read what you write. It makes me think of my work in a better light too. I write better, thus I feel more confident about what I submit. I also think about what I write in terms of appropriateness. When I write for a public audience, I am representing the people I am associated with (ie: employers, professors, schools, etc…). This makes me rethink my choice of wording and also influences my decision for content. If I’m writing for a class, I assume the audience knows what we have done in class. Writing for a blind audience makes me include more background information and context clues than I usually would.

Get started on your own blog for a public audience at WordPress!
Here are some tips for writing for a general audience.

Comments

Gavin Oliver's picture

Great points, Larissa. I also

Great points, Larissa. I also find myself more thoroughly dedicated to my work when there are more eyes on it. The effort is always there when writing to professors, but writing to an expansive audience requires more focus and diligence in checking over the work to ensure that the language and word choices used aren't misinterpreted.

kgthoma's picture

Cool post, Riss.

I like this book too. I agree that most of the time that I am writing something to turn into my teacher, I want to do well but I might be lacking in passion. But when I blog, or write a poem that I am going to publish, I feel that passion. Also, thanks for your helpful links!

kpyfrom's picture

"With regards to writing for

"With regards to writing for a public audience, I think that having that extra pressure encourages me to do better with my work. When we write to just turn into our professor, the pressure to perform well is there, but less. Writing for a public audience is scary" Completely agree! it is very scary!

ald_3's picture

Hi Larissa - Great post! I

Hi Larissa - Great post! I like that you highlighted two key differences between writing for a public vs. private audience with your discussions of interest and appropriateness. Those are great terms when discussing writing in general, and especially in this context. I also like the connection you made between confidence and the quality of your writing. When we're interested in what we're writing, and want to excel at it, we develop confidence and can usually produce more high-quality work. It's great that you noticed how those things go hand in hand. Thanks for sharing!

laurenew's picture

Great post Larissa!

I definitely agree. Writing for a professor is often such a mundane process that even if you're writing on a topic you have a slight interest in, you can lose it. But when we right for a public audience, though it may be scary, at least it's more interesting and more exciting. I'm definitely not concerned with entertaining my professor, just with getting a good grade, but with a public audience my goal is to captivate and keep their interest. Great post, and thanks for the helpful links!