Writing for a Public Audience

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Writing for a public audience can change a writer's style completely because there are many more factors for the writer to think about when realizing that their work will be read by a vast audience. One way that an author might have to make sure they are not offending anyone in their writing because of the many different types of people who are reading their work. An author might not think something if offensive, but a reader coming from a different background might read the same work and be very offended without the author even realizing what they have done. This is why editing and review by other people is pivotal in writing before publishing to a public audience. The feedback from the public audience can also affect how you feel about your own writing. If you think something is a great story but then get negative feedback from an audience you are more likely to take their opinions to heart and start to also think negatively about your work. It can make the difference in your writing style because you look for feedback from readers and what they like/ don't like because at the end of the day the reason a book is published is to gain praise or positive comments and to make money, both of which will not happen if people do not like your book.

smarter than you think

guy with book

http://www.phd2published.com/2012/11/20/writing-for-a-non-academic-audie...

http://writingcommons.org/open-text/genres/public-speaking/audience-anal...

Comments

clscott's picture

I like how you mention how

I like how you mention how feedback from the public affects the way you write. It makes you really sensitive to what people might say if you write something. Great job!

Gavin Oliver's picture

I agree that editing and

I agree that editing and review of a piece is critical to avoiding offensive material, especially when the writing is about a world event that is touchy subject being debated by the public. In the moment of such a scenario, people are more prone to become angry and "go off" about something written.

abbycothran's picture

I really liked your blog and

I really liked your blog and think that you bring up a lot of interesting points: especially "t can make the difference in your writing style because you look for feedback from readers and what they like/ don't like because at the end of the day the reason a book is published is to gain praise or positive comments and to make money, both of which will not happen if people do not like your book."

mkozma's picture

Hey Kelly!

I definitely agree with Abby about how how feedback from writers definitely makes an impact on your writing. I think my Fiction Workshop class from Clemson has definitely helped with this philosophy. We are FORCED to have workshops where we read each other's stories and talk about how to improve them. Some of my best ideas have come from others--and I think that this is something everyone should get to experience.

mamores's picture

Hey Kelly,

Hey Kelly,
writing for an audience scares me so much! There is just so much to keep in mind; you have to make sure you are being sensitive to everybody and every situation. But then again, do you? Maybe we don't need to reach everyone, maybe we just need to reach a specific target that we set out for ourself. Maybe we should make an audience for ourselves instead of inviting everybody to the party.

laurenew's picture

Hey Kelly!

It's always been really tough for me to receive constructive criticism but it is definitely vital in improving your work. I think the possibility of receiving negative feedback when writing for an audience forces you to hold your work to higher standards than you may otherwise, especially if your goal is making money. If that's not important to you, I say who cares what other people think. I guess it all depends on the writer. Great post!