APE

Write > Revise > Rinse > Repeat

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In chapter 8, Kawaski writes on the importance of editing. This immediately struck me as something I need to read, because, admittedly--I am often a poor editor of my own work. It took me until junior year of college to concede that I needed to give myself a day between finishing a draft and editing and reworking it. My beginning stages as a writer were marked (frustratingly) by trying to produce final draft product on the first draft. It seems obvious now, but no matter how good a writer a person is-- things will not come out publisher-ready the first time around.

Perseverance

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I really like the chart on page 20 about how many rejections famous authors have gotten for books that made them famous. This really shows that it's not about how good you are, it's about how your book appeals to certain people. Today, my former English professor posted about being displeased with the idea of a sequel to To Kill a Mockingbird because "it wasn't that good." At the same time, almost everyone I've met here was required to read it in high school, so that shows how different people's opinions can be, even if they're equally educated in literature.

Writing Your Own Book, Now That's Democracy

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Have you guys ever noticed that the word authority has the word author in it? This is something that just occurred to me, I swear. But I feel like it is totally relevant to Kawasaki's points on traditional publishing, the self-publishing revolution, and the ascent of eBooks.

Something that certainly stuck with me was in Chapter 3--(The Three "D's" of Self-Publishing). Determination, Democratization, and something Kawasaki calls disintermediation. Which isn't really a word. I looked it up.

But democracy?
Honestly the last thing I'm thinking of when thinking about my potential career in publishing is anything remotely close to politics, but Kawasaki has a different way of looking at it.