blog 8

The Pluralistic Ignorant Hipster

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After reading this chapter of Clive Thompson's Smarter Than You Think, I personally wasn't aware of what "pluralistic ignorance" was (still), but this nice little definition that Google gave me I think gives me a little more insight:

"In social psychology, pluralistic ignorance is a situation in which a majority of group members privately reject a norm, but incorrectly assume that most others accept it, and therefore go along with it. This is also described as "no one believes, but everyone thinks that everyone believes."

This is sort of funny to me, and reminds me of those annoying people in high school who kept talking about how everyone was condoning animal cruelty because they didn't understand or appreciate vegetarianism.

Ilegal to Have a Menstrual Cycle???

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This reading was really cool and in a lot of ways tied in to me Visual Communications class this semester. We are discussing the freedom to post images and how the law regulates them. For example, I found an article on Facebook discussing how Instagram took down a photo that could possibly cause conflict if people took offense to it, but many people didn't. It was a photo of a woman completely dressed that was having her menstrual cycle. Does that make it morally right to remove the picture?

http://parlormultimedia.com/publishing/sites/default/files/Period.jpg

I Guess Group Work Isn't So Bad After All

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After reading the Chapter "Ambient Awareness" in Clive Thompson's Smarter Than You Think, I was honestly surprised that there was a chapter like this in the book. Thompson's book, in my opinion, covers a lot of ground and I wasn't really expecting to read anything about group work. The quote that appears: "Ambient awareness also endows us with new, sometimes startling abilities. When groups of people "think aloud" in this lightweight fashion, they can perform astonishing acts of collaborative cognition" (Thompson 212-3). I honestly am a big believer in group collaboration, but at the same time sometimes I am hesitant to share my ideas with others especially in the form of social media networking.

Writing for a Public Audience

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Writing for a public audience can change a writer's style completely because there are many more factors for the writer to think about when realizing that their work will be read by a vast audience. One way that an author might have to make sure they are not offending anyone in their writing because of the many different types of people who are reading their work. An author might not think something if offensive, but a reader coming from a different background might read the same work and be very offended without the author even realizing what they have done. This is why editing and review by other people is pivotal in writing before publishing to a public audience. The feedback from the public audience can also affect how you feel about your own writing.

Adapting to Different Standards of Writing

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We obviously write differently for different people. Here is where I found a great list of words that should never be used in an essay. Here are some other words I was taught never to use:

Obviously/clearly--if it's obvious or clear, you shouldn't have to explain it.
Because (at the beginning of a sentence)
In conclusion--this says that everything that follows is something you've already read
I/me/anything in first person unless the prompt specifically asks for something about you
?--you're supposed to answer questions, not pose more.

Audience Affects

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How does writing (and/or designing) for a public audience affect what you say, how you think about your work and what difference it might make?
When writing sad
for an audience, you tend to write leaning towards what you think your audience wants to read, The difference it makes it that you may write very differently according to who you are writing for. For example, I would write a very different short story for my brother versus writing for my English Professor. The type of words used would be different, the length and depth would all be very different. Writing for an audience s

Audience motivates good Writing

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Writing is not the easiest of tasks. It is sometimes hard enough to collect your thoughts and much harder to put those thoughts down on paper. It is especially difficult to write about something that you are not interested in, which is something that often occurs in classrooms. Thompson’s book Smarter Than You Think gives the example of a teacher who encouraged his students to write online, and in this way the students wrote for an audience, and not just for a teacher. This motivated students to really take an interest in writing.

Star Trek: Into Darkness (Khan)

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The readings about Digital School and Ambient Awareness this week were really interesting to me. I especially enjoyed the section on Digital School because I tend to learn better when studying a lesson online. In high school, I had a lot of troubles with math and attended many tutoring sessions during the week outside of class just to be able to keep up. Tutoring helped, but the subject was still a huge struggle for me.