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Where do I buy one of these espresso machines?

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I found Chapter 12 of APE to be an extremely informative and useful chapter. The way the authors broke down the different self-publishing options was super easy to understand and I feel like any author who is just getting interested in self-publishing would benefit from reading this chapter.

The absolute most interesting part of this chapter for me, though, was the Espresso Book Machine. As a coffee lover, the word "espresso" immediately caught my eye and made me seriously crave a Skinny Vanilla Latte from Starbucks (#basic, I know).

starbucks

The struggles after you write a book

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These chapters covered very difficult nuts and bolts information. As a writer I like to think that once I write something that will be the end of the hard stuff. Yet, these chapters very much pointed out that the hard stuff is just getting started. There is just so much to the publishing world that it seems impossible to publish anything all by yourself, but it is possible if you are willing to work hard at it.

Publishing for Uncivilized Apes

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I have enjoyed reading from the APE book the most out of all of the books for class we have read so far and I highly recommend it to anyone looking toward publishing any of their work. Out of all thirteen chapters we were assigned to read this weekend, I enjoyed Chapter 8 the most because it talked a lot about editing and copyediting.

This is something I am really interested in right now as a potential career. For class, I am taking an actual book published by Parlor Press, and am converting it into an ebook. This is work I have never done before, but I really LOVE it.
Writers Without Borders ebook

If I can do it, you can too!

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Wow. APE is one of the most helpful books I’ve ever read. Chapter 13 is especially helpful with all of the book publishing things we’re doing in class now! The authors of this book probably called Chapter 13 the “hairiest in the book” because there is so much to process and get through! This chapter holds a ton of information about the converting process, and there are lots of things to comb through (pun intended). One of the things that is hard about preparing a book for distribution to a wider audience like they talk about in chapter 12 is that you’re going to have to format the file for all of those channels. This takes a lot of time, money, and knowledge about the publishing and converting process for files.

Money Talks

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Chapter 1 of APE titled "Should You Write a Book?" reminded me of a book I read in a previous class with Dr. Blakesley called The Late Age of Print: Everyday Book Culture from Consumerism to Control by Ted Striphas. This book really opened my eyes to the truth about the publishing industry, a field that I was determined to enter upon graduating from Clemson a couple years ago (unsuccessfully, I might add). In this book, Striphas details the one thing that is really at the heart of publishing, the thing that drives motivation at the highest levels of the field: money.

Ebook — Fruitful Features

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I am part of the statistic.

Chapter 4, “The Ascent of Ebooks,” provides a breakdown of the revenue generated from the sale of different types of books (trade, textbook, professional, scholarly, and other), and I am among the 51 percent of the market who has purchased a book under the trade category (adult fiction, adult nonfiction, juvenile fiction, and juvenile nonfiction).

I am not, however, a contributor to the $2.1 billion in profits made by ebooks in the adult-fiction category, or any other, as paperback and hardcover books line my bookshelf and backpack.

That should change, though, and the most important thing I learned about the future of the book in the three chapters we read is the exact reasons ebooks are on the rise.

Embrace the Future (and Rejection)

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Before reading chapters 2-4 in Guy Kawasaki's APE: How to Publish a Book, I'll admit I was pretty ignorant to the publishing processes, both traditional and self-publishing. I liked how realistic he was in outlining the pros and cons of the two different types of publishing, he creates pretty helpful general guidelines for a reader that might be interested in getting their work out there. It was kind of a summed up "Publishing for Dummies" which was good for someone like me, who has zero clue about how any of that works, but can appreciate a good book. He also totally made me want to go purchase a new Kindle, iPad, Tablet, or whatever else they've come up with lately. He definitely knows how to market a product.

E-Books or E-Blasphemy? Why E-Readers Aren't the Devil Incarnate

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APE may not be the most detailed book in the world, but when it comes to navigating the shifting publishing market, anything more specific than what Guy Kawasaki has given us might well by next year become as outdated as a VHS player or a scroll wheel on an iPod--two things archaeologists claim to have existed sometime during the pre-milleniazoic era.

One idea that Kawasaki broached in the early chapters of the book is of the democratization, as he calls it, of the printed media. When publishers, and now even authors, are able to publish their books at a much lower cost, it becomes possible for more and more people to get their work out their. Now more than ever this is the case.

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