publishing

Write > Revise > Rinse > Repeat

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In chapter 8, Kawaski writes on the importance of editing. This immediately struck me as something I need to read, because, admittedly--I am often a poor editor of my own work. It took me until junior year of college to concede that I needed to give myself a day between finishing a draft and editing and reworking it. My beginning stages as a writer were marked (frustratingly) by trying to produce final draft product on the first draft. It seems obvious now, but no matter how good a writer a person is-- things will not come out publisher-ready the first time around.

Got It Covered

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Please, judge my book by its cover—first.

At least that's what authors who self-publish should think despite the renowned cliché, as they should feel comfortable enough with the cover of their book to have people make judgements about it, and also feel confident that people will find their cover appealing and move on to what's inside.

And Chapter 10 of APE makes me feel better that if the time comes to create my own book cover, I'll have it... well... covered.

A writer's biggest concern should naturally be the contents of a book on the inside, but many people won't give a book a second look if its cover is shabby and therefore won't read the glorious words an author worked painstakingly to write.

Hop on Pop and The Interview

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The reason why publishing a book is the most difficult process is because the result is so unpredictable. Some books get rejected by dozens of publishers before making a big breakthrough in the literary world. It's easy for a publisher to look at Hop on Pop by Dr. Seuss and assume that he's on drugs and nobody would buy something so ridiculous, but obviously lots of kids ended up liking books like that. Sometimes the book is also adjusted to fit the taste of a potential audience, and sometimes it's not and that causes problems. The Interview is a great example of a movie that faced lots of issues with its audience.

Where do I buy one of these espresso machines?

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I found Chapter 12 of APE to be an extremely informative and useful chapter. The way the authors broke down the different self-publishing options was super easy to understand and I feel like any author who is just getting interested in self-publishing would benefit from reading this chapter.

The absolute most interesting part of this chapter for me, though, was the Espresso Book Machine. As a coffee lover, the word "espresso" immediately caught my eye and made me seriously crave a Skinny Vanilla Latte from Starbucks (#basic, I know).

starbucks

Not As Easy As It Seems...

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The reading pretty much describes writing a book as the easy part, publishing the book as the real challenge. There is so much more that goes into getting the book out to the audience than people think. In the "harriest chapter" of APE, the list of steps for publishing a book is extremely overwhelming- especially to someone who wants to publish a book. As a writer, I would like to think that the book process is all creativity and putting your thoughts onto paper, but all of the technology involved is enough to frustrate anyone. This being said, I think my advice (even though I have never published a book) is to be patient and know that you took all the time to write your book and create a story that it will be worth the time to do the technical stuff to get your idea out to the world.

The struggles after you write a book

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These chapters covered very difficult nuts and bolts information. As a writer I like to think that once I write something that will be the end of the hard stuff. Yet, these chapters very much pointed out that the hard stuff is just getting started. There is just so much to the publishing world that it seems impossible to publish anything all by yourself, but it is possible if you are willing to work hard at it.

Publishing for Uncivilized Apes

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I have enjoyed reading from the APE book the most out of all of the books for class we have read so far and I highly recommend it to anyone looking toward publishing any of their work. Out of all thirteen chapters we were assigned to read this weekend, I enjoyed Chapter 8 the most because it talked a lot about editing and copyediting.

This is something I am really interested in right now as a potential career. For class, I am taking an actual book published by Parlor Press, and am converting it into an ebook. This is work I have never done before, but I really LOVE it.
Writers Without Borders ebook

If I can do it, you can too!

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Wow. APE is one of the most helpful books I’ve ever read. Chapter 13 is especially helpful with all of the book publishing things we’re doing in class now! The authors of this book probably called Chapter 13 the “hairiest in the book” because there is so much to process and get through! This chapter holds a ton of information about the converting process, and there are lots of things to comb through (pun intended). One of the things that is hard about preparing a book for distribution to a wider audience like they talk about in chapter 12 is that you’re going to have to format the file for all of those channels. This takes a lot of time, money, and knowledge about the publishing and converting process for files.

Money Talks

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Chapter 1 of APE titled "Should You Write a Book?" reminded me of a book I read in a previous class with Dr. Blakesley called The Late Age of Print: Everyday Book Culture from Consumerism to Control by Ted Striphas. This book really opened my eyes to the truth about the publishing industry, a field that I was determined to enter upon graduating from Clemson a couple years ago (unsuccessfully, I might add). In this book, Striphas details the one thing that is really at the heart of publishing, the thing that drives motivation at the highest levels of the field: money.

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