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New Literacies

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In his chapter entitled "New Literacies" Clive Thompson talks about the evolution of different forms of media over the years. What I found most interesting was his idea of the "post it note phase."

dont forget
(Note here, ironically, I have been taking notes on this chapter on virtual sticky notes on my Mac...)

The Age Gap & Technology

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As I continue reading Smarter Than You Think, I'm fascinated by Thompson's discussions of reading, writing, thinking, and the interplay among them all. One topic I found particularly interesting in Chapter 3, "Public Thinking," was Thompson's discussion of Andrea Lunsford and her work in the field of writing research.

An Age of New Literacies

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Studying with my roommate in our apartment last week, I glanced at his computer screen and was dazzled by what I saw.

Instead of poring through the dense collection of information in a textbook in order to acquire knowledge about the content his class was covering, my roommate was participating in a virtual scientific laboratory experiment on his computer so lifelike that he was essentially wearing a white coat and doing the work in-person.

Balance and Lifelogging

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[This post is in response to Smarter than You Think... A week late... too bad I didn't have some Lifelog apparatus to help me not forget....week 3 blog commenters, carry on.]

Smarter Than You Think is very thought provoking, and embraces a topic that I know only a tiny bit about. Thompson’s anecdotes of lifeloggers were wholly terrifying to me. After being thoroughly creeped out for a a page or so, I asked myself—what is so terrifying about this? I am a social media junkie—to a fault, I’d say—and a photographer, a writer, someone curated to record and document, recall and describe. But lifelogging takes it too far for me.

Paying Attention to Your Own Attention

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Print, or PC? Clive Thompson, in chapter one of Smarter Than You Think, “The Rise of the Centaurs,” notes the implications of choices we inevitably face when encountering advanced technology in higher seminaries of learning like Clemson, and emphasizes the importance of introspection in the process. Thompson tells readers that “paying attention to your own attention” (14) is a must when deciding whether, for example, to accomplish long reading assignments on a computer carrying elevated distractions, or to read it in paper form without the helpful tools of technology.

Technology & Memory

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The thing that I loved most about the first chapter of Smarter Than You Think was when Clive Thompson was talking about man and computer working together. Instead of humans or computers being the best on their own, the best outcome came when the two were working together. "Which is smarter at chess-- humans or computers? Neither. Its the two together, working side by side."(page 5) I think that this harmony between us and technology is great and it is exactly where we are headed. I feel like everything I do has technology involved. For instance, (this might be odd but) I work at Starbucks and we have a warmer to heat up the pastries. I tell the warmer what the pastry is but then it knows what temperature and for how long to warm it.

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