Smarter than you think

The Pluralistic Ignorant Hipster

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After reading this chapter of Clive Thompson's Smarter Than You Think, I personally wasn't aware of what "pluralistic ignorance" was (still), but this nice little definition that Google gave me I think gives me a little more insight:

"In social psychology, pluralistic ignorance is a situation in which a majority of group members privately reject a norm, but incorrectly assume that most others accept it, and therefore go along with it. This is also described as "no one believes, but everyone thinks that everyone believes."

This is sort of funny to me, and reminds me of those annoying people in high school who kept talking about how everyone was condoning animal cruelty because they didn't understand or appreciate vegetarianism.

I Guess Group Work Isn't So Bad After All

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After reading the Chapter "Ambient Awareness" in Clive Thompson's Smarter Than You Think, I was honestly surprised that there was a chapter like this in the book. Thompson's book, in my opinion, covers a lot of ground and I wasn't really expecting to read anything about group work. The quote that appears: "Ambient awareness also endows us with new, sometimes startling abilities. When groups of people "think aloud" in this lightweight fashion, they can perform astonishing acts of collaborative cognition" (Thompson 212-3). I honestly am a big believer in group collaboration, but at the same time sometimes I am hesitant to share my ideas with others especially in the form of social media networking.

Writing and Designing for a Public Audience

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computerTo be honest, I love this book. “Smarter than You Think” addresses key problems and situations in our society that focuses on the move towards a technological future. With regards to writing for a public audience, I think that having that extra pressure encourages me to do better with my work. When we write to just turn into our professor, the pressure to perform well is there, but less. Writing for a public audience is scary, and also adds another aspect to writing: interest.